An analysis of salems social order in the crucible by arthur miller

In a clever move, Danforth uses the pregnant Elizabeth, who has been spared from execution, to persuade Proctor to opt for confession and life. While at first only a handful of citizens are indicated, the number soon grows to over a hundred.

One neighbor is John Proctor, who appears while the adults are offstage praying, and after Abigail and her girlfriends have discussed what to reveal about Tituba, who indeed performed voodoo rites.

Puritanism and Individuality Themes and Colors LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Crucible, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

The Crucible demonstrates the struggle against corruption involving the court, which lead to the death of many innocent individuals in Salem.

Act 4 commences in a moonlit prison chamber just before dawn, as Danforth and Parris try to bring Proctor to confess so that they can avoid hanging him, with other prominent citizens, for being an unrepentant sinner.

Miller relates this technique to his experience with the court in which they attempted to make him feel protected, if he would reveal his knowledge. Thinking of his three children and of his wife, he chooses to sign a confession; however, he immediately regrets his decision and refuses to give up the paper.

This proves that the court did whatever they could to extract information from the suspects. Shouts are heard offstage as Corey defends his wife, another accused witch. While many of those found guilty of witchcraft avoid hanging by confessing a connection to the devil, 19 others are hanged.

Just as a now-remorseful Hale tries to intervene, the girls, whom Danforth has brought in, start a ghastly pantomime, pretending to have been bewitched by Mary. These divisions were incorporated into this Enote and do not appear in the actual play.

In the play, Abigail and several other young women accuse innocent citizens of Salem for the action of witchcraft. Act 3 ends with Corey and Proctor thrown into jail and a disgusted Hale quitting the court.

Reputation Reputation is tremendously important in theocratic Salem, where public and private moralities are one and the same.

Knowing that the punishment for their behavior will be severe, the girls claim that they were possessed by the spirits of members of the community who are trying to initiate them into witchcraft. At the end of act 2 Hale faces an increasingly painful moral dilemma, exacerbated by unmistakable signs of a judicial system going haywire.

In a desperate attempt to discredit Abigail as a witness, Proctor then admits his adultery; however, when his wife is brought in to verify the story, she tries to save his reputation by denying the affair.

This concern leads directly into act 3.

We will protect you. In Salem, everything and everyone belongs to either God or the devil; dissent is not merely unlawful, it is associated with satanic activity. How to Write a Summary of an Article? These rigid rules of conduct helped the Puritans endure the persecution they faced in Europe and, after they came to America, created a close-knit community able to withstand the harsh weather and Native American attacks common to New England in the 17th century.

The most obvious case is Abigail, who uses the situation to accuse Elizabeth Proctor of witchcraft and have her sent to jail. Since religious men ran their government, the Puritans considered all government actions to be necessarily "good," or sanctioned by Heaven.Several characters in The Crucible face a tough decision: to protect their reputation or their integrity.

Parris, Abigail, and others to protect their reputations. Rebecca Nurse and, eventually, John Proctor, choose to protect their integrity. In rigid communities like Salem, a bad reputation can result in social or even physical punishment.

The Crucible is set in a theocratic society, in which the church and the state are one, and the religion is a strict, austere form of Protestantism known as Puritanism. Because of the theocratic nature of the society, moral laws and state laws are one and the same: sin and the status of an individual’s soul are matters of public concern.

The Crucible Summary

When Arthur Miller published The Crucible in the early s, he simply outdid the historians at their own game" (22).

This lesson plan's goal is to examine the ways in which Miller interpreted the facts of the witch trials and successfully dramatized them. The Crucible begins in the house of Reverend Samuel Parris, whose daughter, Betty, lies unconscious in bed upstairs. Prior to the opening of the play, Parris discovered Betty, his niece Abigail, and Tituba, his black slave from Barbados, dancing in the forest outside of Salem at midnight.

The Crucible Arthur Miller.

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

A NOTE ON THE HISTORICAL ACCURACY OF THIS PLAY The Crucible young adults, and until this strange crisis he, like the rest of Salem, never conceived that social disorder in any age breeds such. The Crucible was written inby Arthur Miller, a famous American playwright. The play is about the Salem witch trials.

The play is about the Salem witch trials.

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An analysis of salems social order in the crucible by arthur miller
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